#Hindi Diwas Special: 10 Hindi Books You Must Read

Hindi being the national language of our country it also happens to be the most spoken language in the country too, having its own versions depending on region. What better way to know our country and its culture than reading books in Hindi. Time and again these stories have captured the real essence of our society with its beliefs, culture and tradition intact. Taking inspiration from everything starting with mythology to political affairs these stories encapsulate the progress of our country aptly. Sharing ten of my personal favourites to give you a glimpse of their inimitable grandeur:

Best, Hindi, Books, Diwas, Favourites, Tales, Pensieve, Article

Aapka Bunti by Mannu Bhandari

Mannu Bhandari’s stories usually revolve around relationships, gender inequality and strong, independent women. She is considered one of the pioneers of Nayi Kahaani movement of the 50s.

This story, narrated from the perspective of a child called Bunty gives us a close glimpse into a middle class Indian family and their daily struggles for survival. The narration is mostly in the form of letters written by Bunty and hence the title (Loosely translated it means: Yours, Bunty)

Best, Hindi, Books, Diwas, Favourites, Tales, Pensieve, ArticlePinjar by Amrita Pritam

Talking about the conditions prevalent in our society during Partition this story talks about its impact on women and their living conditions. This story by Amrita Pritam has also been adapted into a hindi film by the same name.

Best, Hindi, Books, Diwas, Favourites, Tales, Pensieve, Article

 Zindaginama by Krishna Sobti

Touted as a controversial novel in its times the story yet again has the pre-Independence India described in details. It touches the raw nerves by dissecting the complexities of human relationships in great details.

Best, Hindi, Books, Diwas, Favourites, Tales, Pensieve, Article

Tamas by Bhisham Sahni

Also made into a Television movie this book is set in the backdrop of Partition amidst a riot stricken Pakistan. It highlights the plight of Sikhs and Hindus during that time.

Tilotama by Maithili Sharan Gupta

Written by one of the first winners of National Poet Award in post-Independence India, this book is considered amongst the stalwarts that contributed to Hindi Literature largely.

Best, Hindi, Books, Diwas, Favourites, Tales, Pensieve, Article

Ratinath Ki Chachi by Nagarjuna

A debut novel by Vaidya Nath Mishra a.k.a Nagarjuna this book is considered a very prominent novel in Hindi Literature mainly because it has a very strong feminist voice. Coming from a small village in Bihar the author has depicted the trials and tribulations of people living in those areas amidst poverty.

Best, Hindi, Books, Diwas, Favourites, Tales, Pensieve, Article

Raag Darbari by Shri Lal Shukla

Known for his satires based on politics and current social conditions this piece highlights the diminishing values in our society in 60s.

Best, Hindi, Books, Diwas, Favourites, Tales, Pensieve, Article

Godaan by Premchand

Considered to be the last work of the author this is touted to be his best. Godaan is till date considered a masterpiece. Revolving around a peasant this book paints a picture of ethos so brilliantly that it is difficult to notice the ugliness of it all.

Best, Hindi, Books, Diwas, Favourites, Tales, Pensieve, Article

Maila Aanchal by Phanishwar Nath Renu

After Godaan this book is considered to be the most significant Hindi novel. Based on the lives of people living in a remote village the story describes the changes a particular doctor brings along after moving there from a city.

1304110307353904y135

Surya Ki Antim Kiran Se Surya Ki Pehli Kiran Tak by Surendra Varma

Though this story was initially written as a play it was translated and read so many times for the sheer beauty of its story.

So how many of these have you read? And which are your favourites apart from these?

Article Contributed by: Namrata

Best, Hindi, Books, Diwas, Favourites, Tales, Pensieve, ArticleAfter being an investment banker for a decade Namrata found her true calling in books. With numbers playing in her mind and words throbbing through her veins since half a decade now she writes, reads and ofcourse forgets to count them! She can be reached at privytrifles@gmail.com

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *